Colourful Wallpaper to grow up with …

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There are literally thousands of stunning wallpaper designs on the internet. Trust me, I’ve been looking around to find one for my daughters bedroom, that will carry her through from being 8 to her teens. The ones I have chosen for you to see are of course, quite loud, but I think they would add great character to a room – maybe with just one wall covered. I would probably make a plain roman blind to go with this one made by Pip Studio and for sale on Not on The Highstreet by FIFTY ONE PERCENT ( no, I’m not shouting, that’s how they write it ! ). Love all the bobbins and sewing paraphernalia. :)

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Whether it is because I am obsessed with flamingos or maybe my just in the genes – Mae loves them too so this is definitely a consideration. We are only going to do one wall – I know feature walls aren’t as trendy as they used to be but I think it works well in a kids room, especially if it’s not too big. She loves blue too so it could be the one !

This wallpaper is by Cole and Son and and for sale at WallPaper Direct.

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This may not be every girls cup of tea * sorry, I’ll get my coat * … but it’s so dainty and pretty and I am sure would look amazing up. How could you ever get bored of looking at it ? It’s a Brian Yates print on the Select Wallpapers website.

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More birds. A really vibrant print, again from not on the Highstreet. What do you think ?
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I fell in love with this wallpaper the first time I saw it. It would probably mean a lot more to adults than it would to the ‘ new generation ‘ but it’s very retro and kitsch. Mae likes kitsch. So we might be on to a winner. This Penguin library wallpaper is by Osborne and Little.

My taste is very LOUD when it comes to prints as you may know. But I think these are all perfect for a growing girls bedroom.

What are your thoughts ? Do you have a particular favourite print that you’ve seen recently ?

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Lucy x

Chilling in Ibiza at Bambuddha

Ibiza

It has been almost a month since my last post. We went away on a lovely, relaxing holiday to Ibiza, which included a trip ( or two ) to Bambuddha. I had every intention on writing about as soon I got back but came down with a really full on virus and have only just really mustered the energy to get typing again.

According to my doctor – it is called Erythema Multiforme and appear to have had the more severe form. As I mentioned before we have had some stress recently and apparently that and sunshine can bring it out. Well, better out than in !

I’ve been living off fresh blended juices for the last two weeks because I couldn’t really swallow and now swear by them. They’ve helped massively.

Ibiza East

On to a much more cheerful note – Ibiza was an amazing family holiday. Lovely people, beautiful sunsets and the area we stayed in was very chilled. Really recommend Cala Llonga for families. There is the Amante Beach Club which overlooks the sea, where they play atmospheric house music whilst you eat. So good we visited several times. As with most places there, it welcomed children.

Bambudda teriyaki salmon

Everyone recommended Bambuddha for somewhere to experience a nice meal, and we weren’t disappointed so ended up visiting there twice. The aroma of Nag Champa meets you as you enter and the staff are second to none in their approach to each table. Bambuddha itself is situated between Santa Eulalia and Santa Gertrudis, so depending on where you are staying, a little journey but well worth it. Fantastic ambience.

The food was so good and made me want to be a better cook myself, which I think is always a good sign when it comes to a restaurant. It’s a fusion of Thai and Japanese flavours. Andy recommends the Yellow Seabass Curry and I loved the Teriyaki Marinated Salmon and Wasabi Mashed Potatoes. The girls had Sushi  – which was perfect !

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We spent most of our time sitting around the pool and swimming. One trip over to watch the sunset at Sunset Ashram but it was rammed ( understandably in the peak season ) so we just had a dip in the nice clear waters and headed back. One place I would’ve liked to have re – visited after my last trip there was Ibiza Old Town – next time !

I’m sure there must be lots of other places to eat that we could’ve tried. If you know of any then please do leave a comment..

Have a good week. :)

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My Guest Post for Artist – Jessica Zoob

jessica zoob artist A quick update to tell you about my guest post on the very talented artist Jesssica Zoob’s blog. She very kindly asked me to write about LucyLovesYa.

Jessica Zoob trained at Central School of Art and Nottingham University and worked as a theatre designer for 7 years at venues such as The Royal National Theatre and Bristol Old Vic. For 14 years now though she has worked exclusively as a contemporary artist from her home and studio in Sussex. She exhibits around London regularly and her work is shown worldwide in private collections. Not only that – you will often spot her designs in stores. Just recently I saw some amazing cushions with her artwork on them in John Lewis.

artist jessica zoob I love Jessica’s style and find her use of colour really emotive. It’s easy to lose yourself in her creations, I think it’s partly because of the different textures she uses in the process. I could stare at her paintings for hours and each time I see something different and unique.

If you’d like to see or read more about Jessica Zoob then click here for the website.

My post can be found here.

Please share the love by clicking on the links below xx

All images copyright of Jessica Zoob 2014.

Alternative DJ decks inspiration – you have to stand for something

retro drinks cabinet bar for dj decks

We’re looking out for something to put our decks on at the moment – some alternative DJ decks inspiration is on the cards.

A long time ago I had a stand made up out of wood but this is now spoken for, covered in my kids art and craft stuff. You can buy DJ stands for vinyl but we are after something a bit kitsch so that we can have it the living room. :) I’ve had a little look online for starters and found a few pieces.

Love the retro drinks cabinet on Ebay, above. I reckon we could squeeze the decks on to it and it would fit in a corner quite well.

dj record stand

The retro legs on this console do it for me – shame this is in the States ! It’s a nice piece to have in your home. I found it on Etsy.

dj decks stand

This Soundbase stand is similar to the one we originally had made up. Simple design but probably the most practical.

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Something that needs a bit of TLC would be nice too, plus you could store the vinyl underneath this one.

Nowadays, lots of people use DJ software or CDs much more which is understandable as it takes up much less room but I will always be an ‘old skool’ record lover because the sound is like nothing else. It’s also the feel of the vinyl and the beautiful artwork on albums. I feel they should never be hidden away. Some of the designs are just beautiful.

If you have any ideas on stands – send them my way … and while we’re on the topic of music, what was the first record you ever bought ? Leave me a comment under this post or tweet @lucylovesyablog.

You can find more of my inspirations and ideas over on my Pinterest and Instagram pages.

Make Roman Blinds – a Tutorial

As promised recently, having shown you my new sewing room roman blinds – here is a tutorial on how to make one for yourself. I’ve had some emails and tweets asking where my fabric is from – Kingdom Interiors and it’s Perroquet by Nina Campbell.

Before we get started, you will need:

Main fabric ( we will work out how much shortly.. )

Interlining ( Optional )

Blind lining fabric

Thread and sewing needle, scissors, pins, fabric chalk, tape measure, scissors, sewing machine, staple gun

Wooden baton cut to size inside or outside recess

Dowel rod and base bar – both of which you will need to cut to size.

Eye rings, blind cord, blind acorn, screw eyes and 1 cleat with screws.

All of these things should be obtainable from your local fabric shop, if not, try eBay.

Measuring up

Main fabric

You will either want the blind to sit inside or outside the recess. As you can see the one I made sits outside. You can do either as I have instructions here for both. Either way this tutorial is based on you using a 20 mm deep wooden baton. There are other methods but this is how I like to make them. If you are going outside the recess, the width of the window sill is your guide on how wide to make the blind and cut the baton.

Whether making for inside or outside the recess – measure vertically and horizontally , the top of the blinds will be stapled to the very top of the baton so remember to add allowances in the fabric length for this –  plus 5cm for a return at the top and 12 cm hem for the bottom. Each side of the blind will need 5cm return = 10cm total.

Work out all of these measurements below before buying your fabric to ensure you have enough – make sure too that your fabric width is wide enough for your window. Unless you have a plain fabric or a non obvious pattern you won’t be able to use the fabric sideways.

Horizontal: Desired width of finished blind + 2 x 5 cm ( 10 cm ) = Total width to cut.

Vertical:  length from very top of baton down to window ledge or desired finished drop + 17cm ( return and hem ) = Total length to cut.

NB. Before you cut, if the fabric has an obvious pattern – make sure you have decided on which parts of this you want to use and that you have it the right way up. In other words, frame in your mind the finished blind and how you want the it to look. I made sure on mine that the birds were as central as possible.

Interlining ( optional )

Same measurements as main fabric. I like to use this as it makes the blind more sturdy and it blocks out some light. You could use black out lining instead if you are making a bedroom blind – this will make your room much darker when they are down.

Lining fabric

Horizontal: Finished width + 4.5 cm either side ( 9cm ).

Vertical: Finished drop + 5cm return for top edge.

You will also be adding rod pockets to the lining – so will need to also add on 2.5 cm per pocket ( dependent on size – the larger the blind the more rod pockets will be required )

Putting your baton up

I recommend cutting to size and stapling the rough side of your velcro on to the top before doing this. You can always do it afterwards but if you have little space between baton and ceiling it will be trickier once it’s up.

Making the blind

Cut out your fabrics. Double check you have the right measurements ( above ) and go for it. Do the same with your lining fabric.

Starting with your main fabric – lay out flat with wrong side facing up. Place the interlining on top of the main fabric so that all corners match up and press both sides towards you by 5 cm. The interlining should be sitting inside the main fabric. Snip the corners ( see pic below ) off the interlining at the bottom of the blind to avoid too much bulk later when you mitre them ( you will see what I mean .. ). Then fold the lining fabric in by 5cm each side too and press.

Now, you need to work out where the rod pockets are to be sewn in on the lining fabric.

To give you an example – my blind has 3 rods and so is divided into 7 sections ( the number of sections is always the number of rod pockets multiplied by 2 then add 1 ) from the base of the screw eyes to the bottom of the finished blind is 121.5 cm so divide this by 7 and each section measures 17.4 cm – therefore the spacing between each rod pocket is 2 x 17.4 cm which = 34.8 cm.

Making sure the wrong side ( the side you have pressed the seams into ) of the lining is facing up Stick a pin where each rod pocket is going to be and then mark 125mm either side of each pin. One by one, fold and press each pocket so that the marks are facing each other ( each ” loop ” should total 2.5 cm ), press them and then machine sew all along the widths of the blind. You now have your rod pockets.

As above, lay out you main fabric ( if you have added interlining this should still be sitting inside ) with right side facing up. Lay the lining on top, wrong side up – checking that the top and bottoms of the main and lining fabric are adjacent and that the lining is placed centrally, you’ll find that the lining is just short in size of the main fabric – about 2.5 cm each side. Ease out any wrinkles, then mitre ( fold corners ) the bottoms of the main fabric inwards ( this is why you cut the the corners off the interlining ) so that they are the same width as the lining and pin to the main fabric. Machine sew a 1 cm line along the width off all of these layers to hold them together.

Turn the main fabric and lining out the other way so that the right side of of each is on the outsides. The interlining is now in the inside, still folded inside the main fabric. Pull the top of the lining up so that it matches the top of the main fabric and ease out any creases in all layers and then pin all along the top and sides. The recess bottom of the blind should look like this:

Give the blind a pressing all over. Double check for any creases because you are next going to machine sew a 1 cm line all along the top width of layers. Once you’ve done this, either machine or hand sew the soft side of the velcro all along the top of the wrong side of the blind ( above ).

Place the base bar inside the bottom of the blind. They generally come in metre lengths so you may need to cut to size.Now, from the very bottom of each side, herringbone stitch the reverse of the main blind to the lining. Don’t yet stitch up the rod pocket as you haven’t inserted them yet :)

Hand sew eye rings 5 cm in on each rod pocket and then space others in between, depending on how many cords you are using vertically, to pull the blinds up ( I used 3 on my blind ) and then stab stitch just under each of the rod pockets. I tend to do two stitches as find it holds all layers together better, especially if you have interlining.

Insert your cut to size dowel rods and then sew up the ends of the rod pockets. 

Screw the screw eyes into the base of the baton. They need to be directly above the threads and one above the cleat – time to decide here if you want this to be on the left or right of the window. Screw the cleat in half way down the window ready.

On each bottom eye ring attach a cord by tying a knot and then thread up through each eye ring above then to the left or right, dependent on which side the cleat will be.

Putting the blind up

Velcro the blind together at the top. Now cut and thread the blind cords up through the relevant screw eyes above and then if going left thread all cords through each screw eye including the one above the cleat or vice versa if you are going right. Gently pull all cords down at the side so that the they are all taught at the back and threaded without any loose cords and then braid all cords together down the side ( this is for safety too ). Cut the braid where the cleat is and attach a weight on the end by threading the plait through and then knotting it underneath.

When you pull the braided cord the blind should pull up evenly ! It might take a few days to sit “right” so I recommend leaving it up for a few days for the folds to settle.